“A talent for teaching is very rare. You have it.... a pure pleasure to listen to.”
Olek Zemplinski

Artistic Development Series

In thirty years of teaching, I've seen students run into many obstacles as they pursue artistic careers. Some lack talent. Some lack training. Some face tough markets. But even in impossible markets, a few continue to train and improve and prepare and produce. The greatest battle often happens within an artist's own personality. Our temperaments and feelings affect our art and our careers — for better and worse.

Click here to sign up or to check if this course is now open for registration.

These seminars meet for three hours each (each of these are individual seminars):

Seminar TOPICS
Seminar 1 Artistic Temperaments & Achievement
The Science & The Art
Seminar 2 The Creative Process
The Great Balancing Act
Seminar 3 How To Get Hired in the Arts
Stories to Steer You into Real Jobs

In Seminar 1, I'll show that there are many “artistic temperaments” and explain some modern ways of matching your personality to your artistic niche. You'll see profiles of great artists and how they have included a great variety of types. Then I will give you what I believe is the secret of “finding yourself” in relation to your work (hint: it's a secret that has been well- known for thousands of years.)

In Seminar 2, I'll explain how the creative process requires you to be two kinds of people: Spontaneous and Deliberate. Each has a strength. Each has a risk. Each must find a way to balance the process. If you don't, your spontaneity will lead you to inspired slobbery, or your deliberacy will lead you to disciplined predictability. I will give you some simple recommendations to help you maximize your productivity and surprise yourself with your best work.

In Seminar 3, I will tell you how people get hired. I'll show you the realities of the market as I experienced them in my illustration career, and what I've observed from watching hundreds of art students pursue careers. I believe there are three big factors involved, which I'll explain by telling you stories of my own and other artists' failures and successes.

Materials:

This is a lecture seminar. Bring a notebook if you'd like to take notes, or a sketchpad if you'd like to draw caricatures of the teacher.

Note:

This is not a university curriculum course and you will not receive college credit for it.

Endorsements

“I've done The Artist's Way and any number of seminars and classes on the creative process and found most of them to be illuminating, but not much help to my career as an artist. Marshall's seminar snatched all those abstract concepts out of the air and put them into my artist's toolbox.”
Neal Romanek
Screenwriter
“Just had to say thanks again for the insightful Temperaments class last night. You really are a natural teacher. Very engaging & informative.”
Ed Eyth
Senior Character Designer, Henson Studios
“The crazy thing with Marshall is that in a weekend you feel more prepared and inspired for life as a creative professional than you do after years in the 'academy.'”
Eric Reimer
Illustrator
 
“Great class!! The neurons in my little brain felt like a 4th-of-July sparkler after I left class. Best money I’ve spent in a long time. I like your workshops because all the information is condensed compared to a little here and there during a regular semester. As always, you are a wonderful teacher. I appreciate you sharing your knowledge and yourself with the class.”
—Cindy Thacker
“Never a dull moment, by the end of the seminar I was more intrigued than when we began. Marshall opened my eyes to many possibilities.”
—Stephanie Dillon
“I really enjoyed your class. Although I am an educator and not an artist, lots of creative effort goes into what I do. I wish that all the teachers I work with could have heard your message.”
—Shelley Arnold
“...astonishingly on target with reference to what creative people need to know to succeed.”
—Elizabeth Knox, Artist
“Thank you for the insightful lectures like always! I never fail to leave inspired, brand new, and full of more energy!”
Erika Chan